By David Grossman

 

Matthew Cumming knows all about pressure, stress, tension and has an exemplary work ethic.

Now, a lawyer specializing in a corporate and securities practice with expertise in real estate, mergers and capital markets, just to name a few, Cumming had to learn about teamwork.

Even before he worked as a clerk at the Supreme Court of Canada, or started teaching law, Cumming was devoting substantial hours enhancing his education at Yale University, the University of Toronto and the University of Cambridge.

A rising star and recipient of many accolades, including academic awards, Cumming – bright, intellectual and a master in his career – is well aware that his good fortune and prosperity just may have had it roots dating back to when he was a boy at Upper Canada College.

“Great years, remember them well,” says Cumming, who also finds time to teach and is the co-author of a shareholders remedies text. “At UCC, I had a great group of peers and the school taught me how to focus on a goal – and meet it.”

On the subject of goals, Cumming’s remembers when his father bought him a pair of skates at age 3.

“I loved hockey, worked hard at skating and learning to play and aspired to play at the College level,” he says.

Cumming, modest about his solid performance on the ice, played in four leagues finishing his competitive years in 1999 after a season with Weiden EV, a Division One team in Germany.  His numbers were good: 25 goals and 29 assists in 54 games and, well, even a career-high 157 minutes in penalties.

Having spent four seasons of hockey with the Yale Bulldogs in the very competitive Division One of the Eastern College Athletic Conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Cumming also suited up for the St. Michael’s Buzzers in the Metro Junior A Hockey League.

Yet, playing left wing, Cumming has some special memories about his days with the UCC Blues.

“The camaraderie at UCC stands out; it was just a wonderful time with the guys on the hockey team,” says Cumming, “the relationships created and developed between younger and older players, the mentors and some great coaches. I learned a great deal at UCC.”

And how about that memorable moment?

“I was in Grade 10 and being on a team that won the Ontario high school championship,” says Cumming. “It was back in 1992 and the game went to double overtime. That was something I’ll never forget.”

For the record, UCC would go on to dominate the provincial scene winning five gold medals in a 10-year span.